Articles


Document Type
Journal article (JA)
Title
Hydrochemical controls on reservoir nutrient and phytoplankton dynamics under storms
Author
Chen, Nengwang(1); Mo, Qiongli(1); Kuo, Yi-Ming(2); Su, Yuping(3); Zhong, Yanping(1)
Address
(1) Key Laboratory of the Coastal and Wetland Ecosystems, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Coastal Ecology and Environmental Studies, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen; 361102, China; (2) School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan; 430074, China; (3) College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou; 350007, China
RPAddress
Email
ResearchID
ORCID
Journal
Science of the Total Environment
Publisher
Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0048-9697
Published
2018-04-01, 619-620:301-310.
JCR
2
ImpactFactor
4.900
ISBN
Fund_Code
HYMC
HYDD
HYKSRQ
HYJSRQ
HYLWLB
HYJB
Keywords
Climate change - Eutrophication - Factor analysis - Groundwater - Multivariant analysis - Nitrates - Nutrients - Phytoplankton - River pollution - Runoff - Storms - Surface waters
Abstract
Eutrophication and undesired algal blooms in surface water are common and have been linked to increasing nutrient loading. Effects of extreme events such as storms on reservoir nutrient and phytoplankton remain unclear. Here we carried out continuous high-frequency measurements in a long and narrow dam reservoir in southeast China during a storm period in June–July 2015. Our results show a strong nutrient-phytoplankton relationship as well as a very rapid response to storm runoff. We observed an increase in total suspended matter (TSM), ammonium (NH4-N), and dissolved reactive phosphate (DRP), with a sharp decline in chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in the high flow periods. Afterward, Chl-a, total phytoplankton abundance and Cyanophyta fraction elevated gradually. Nitrate was diluted at first with increasing discharge before concentration increased, likely following a delayed input of groundwater. Physiochemical parameters and Chl-a were evenly distributed in the water column during the flooding period. However, 10% of NH4-N and 25% of DRP were removed in surface water (0–1 m) when an algal bloom (Chl-a > 30 μg L? 1) occurred 10 days after peak discharge. Conversely, total particulate P (TPP) of surface water was 58% higher than in the deeper water. Dynamic factor analysis (DFA) revealed that TSM, NH4-N, DRP, total P and discharge significantly explain Chl-a variations following storms (Ceff= 0.89). These findings highlight that the reservoir ecosystem was vulnerable to pulse input from storm runoff and the Cyanophyta bloom was likely fueled by phosphate and ammonium rather than nitrate. ? 2017 Elsevier B.V.
WOS Categories
Environmental Sciences
Accession Number
WOS:000424144200032
UT
20174704422334
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.09.216
ESI_Type
ENVIRONMENT/ECOLOGY
Collection
SCIE, EI

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