Articles


Document Type
Journal article (JA)
Title
Storm induced estuarine turbidity maxima and controls on nutrient fluxes across river-estuary-coast continuum
Author
Chen, Nengwang(1,2); Krom, Michael D.(3,4); Wu, Yinqi(2); Yu, Dan(2); Hong, Huasheng(1,2)
Address
(1) State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China; (2) Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Coastal Ecology and Environmental Studies, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China; (3) School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel; (4) School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
RPAddress
Xiamen Univ, Coll Environm & Ecol, Xiamen 361102, Peoples R China.
Email
ResearchID
ORCID
Journal
Science of the Total Environment
Publisher
Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0048-9697
Published
2018-07-01, 628-629:1108-1120.
JCR
2
ImpactFactor
4.900
ISBN
Fund_Code
National Natural Science Foundation of China [41376082, 41676098, U1305231]; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities [20720160120]; Program of Xiamen Southern Oceanographic Center [15PZB009NF05]
HYMC
HYDD
HYKSRQ
HYJSRQ
HYLWLB
HYJB
Keywords
Climate change - Coastal zones - Estuaries - Eutrophication - Flood control - River pollution - Rivers - Storms - Turbidity - Water supply
Abstract
Climate change is likely to increase the frequency and intensity of tropical storms. However, the impacts of major storms on nutrient cycling processes in the river-estuary-coast continuum are poorly understood. Continuous observations were made at lower river stations and on a transect down the Jiulong River Estuary in south east China for three storms in 2013–2014. There were major increases in both dissolved nutrients and suspended particulate matter (SPM) brought down the river during storms. Strong Estuarine Turbidity Maxima (ETM) were observed during major storms and were the result of SPM brought down rivers augmented by sediment scoured within the Upper Estuary (salinity = 0 psu) and possibly also from behind the dikes opened for flood control. There were major increases in dissolved nutrients (nitrate, ammonium and phosphate) in the Upper Estuary particularly during major Storms C (July 2013) and D (May 2014). These increases were probably due to river inflows with surrounding runoff, pore water supply and nutrients desorbed from scoured sediment. During major Storm D there were greater nutrient fluxes through the estuary-coast interface compared to the nutrients supplied through the river-estuary interface while the opposite pattern was observed during normal flow. The increased supply of ammonium and phosphate to the coastal region caused increased chlorophyll a once the light inhibiting SPM had been removed from the water column. This is likely to increase the potential of eutrophication. Storm induced increases in N:P:Si supplied from the estuary to the coastal region increased the degree of P limitation. ? 2018 Elsevier B.V.
WOS Categories
Environmental Sciences
Accession Number
WOS:000432462000111
UT
20180804821226
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.060
ESI_Type
ENVIRONMENT/ECOLOGY
Collection
SCIE, EI

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